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Item# 35010   $90.00  Add to cart   Show All Images   Download PDF
Medal of an Attendee of the International Conference of Veterans of War and Participants of "Antifascist" Liberation Movements in Moscow, 1965.

In brass with silver-plating, gilt, and enamels. The quality is superb throughout. Medallion measures 35.6 mm tall (incl. eyelet), 30.2 mm wide. An interesting and unusual artwork featuring a Latin "V" for Victory, a clear indication that many of the medals were intended for foreigners some of whom came from the western countries. The reverse has raised inscription "International Conference of Veterans of War and Participants of Antifascist Liberation Struggle. Moscow". The enamel on the suspension is royal blue (incidentally, a traditional color of Soviet State Security which super

In brass with silver-plating, gilt, and enamels. The quality is superb throughout. Medallion measures 35.6 mm tall (incl. eyelet), 30.2 mm wide. An interesting and unusual artwork featuring a Latin "V" for Victory, a clear indication that many of the medals were intended for foreigners some of whom came from the western countries. The reverse has raised inscription "International Conference of Veterans of War and Participants of Antifascist Liberation Struggle. Moscow". The enamel on the suspension is royal blue (incidentally, a traditional color of Soviet State Security which supervised partisan movement on the enemy-occupied territories.) On the reverse of the suspension is a raised logo "LMD" of the Leningrad Mint.

In mid-60s, the fledgling Brezhnev administration made a renewed effort to propagandize Soviet role in WW2 both domestically and abroad. Starting from that point, increased benefits and attention were given to hitherto largely neglected Soviet veterans. In 1965, the May 9th Victory Day was for the first time celebrated in the Soviet Union as a national non-working holiday; the first of the Victory Anniversary medals was awarded during the same year. The period marked a beginning of attempts to reduce antagonism with the West (albeit ostensibly) and simultaneously improve image of the USSR in foreign countries. Not coincidentally, an international veteran conference was organized in Moscow at the same time. Large part of its attendees were members of anti-Nazi resistance movements in Europe (the Soviets of course preferred to call them "Antifascist" because the term National Socialism hit way too close to socialist home).
$90.00  Add to cart