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https://www.collectrussia.com/DISPITEM.HTM?item=32790
Item# 32790   $90.00  Add to cart   Show All Images   Download PDF
Oval wall plaque with sculptured portrait of Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin, circa 1960s-70s.

Molded in hard plastic with matte silver finish, measures 6" in height by approx. 4.5" across. There is a small wire loop at the top to hang on the wall. Based on the artwork and method of manufacture, this uncommon bar-relief portrait was produced no later than the 70s.

In excellent condition. There are no visible dings or wear to the silver finish on the front. Minor scuffs to the verso from hanging on the wall, not detractive.

Alexander Pushkin is considered the greatest Russian poet and the founder of the modern Russian literature. He was born on 6 June 1799 and die

Molded in hard plastic with matte silver finish, measures 6" in height by approx. 4.5" across. There is a small wire loop at the top to hang on the wall. Based on the artwork and method of manufacture, this uncommon bar-relief portrait was produced no later than the 70s.

In excellent condition. There are no visible dings or wear to the silver finish on the front. Minor scuffs to the verso from hanging on the wall, not detractive.

Alexander Pushkin is considered the greatest Russian poet and the founder of the modern Russian literature. He was born on 6 June 1799 and died aged 37, killed in a duel on 10 February 1837. He published his first poem at the age of 15 and was widely recognized and hailed by the literary establishment by the time he had graduated from the Imperial Lyceum in Tsarskoe Selo.

Pushkin pioneered the use of vernacular speech in his poems and plays, creating a style of storytelling associated with Russian literature ever since and greatly influencing later Russian writers (his contribution to Russian language is often compared to that of Shakespeare for the English). He was also very active politically and gradually became a spokesman for the literary radicals. In the early 1820s, he was exiled to southern Russia by the government. Because of his liberal political views and influence on generations of Russian freethinkers, the Bolsheviks portrayed him as an opponent to bourgeois literature and a predecessor of Soviet literature and poetry.

While not inscribed, this plaque is the sort of item that could have been given as an award in a writing competition or as a further motivator to an already outstanding student. It can be a tasteful, discreet decoration for a study or collector's room.
$90.00  Add to cart