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https://www.collectrussia.com/DISPITEM.HTM?item=25292
Item# 25292   $745.00  Add to cart   Show All Images   Download PDF
Large ivory-handled silver creamer or milk pitcher with 1834 hallmarks, excellent example of the quality silverware seen on the tables of Moscow's well-to-do during the reign of Tsar Nicholas I.
Clear hallmarks identify the silversmith as Nikolai Dubrovin (active 1822-1855; died 1862).

Weighs 268 grams (which includes the handle); 14cm tall, 8cm wide, 16cm from outer curve of the ivory handle to front of the spout. Interior still brightly gilded, 2cm wide band around the outside boasts a profusion of roses, the lip covered with an attractive and ornate geometric design. One side bears an engraved British looking coronet above the initials "O S" in "Old English" Latin letters. Perhaps this was initially a wedding or birthday gift for an English friend or rela

Clear hallmarks identify the silversmith as Nikolai Dubrovin (active 1822-1855; died 1862).

Weighs 268 grams (which includes the handle); 14cm tall, 8cm wide, 16cm from outer curve of the ivory handle to front of the spout. Interior still brightly gilded, 2cm wide band around the outside boasts a profusion of roses, the lip covered with an attractive and ornate geometric design. One side bears an engraved British looking coronet above the initials "O S" in "Old English" Latin letters. Perhaps this was initially a wedding or birthday gift for an English friend or relative?

The most important hallmarks are on the bottom: a Moscow city mark dated 1834, a number "84" indicating the silver content, a НД (or "ND") and "1834" stamp for the silversmith, Nikolai Dubrovin. The identity of the letters on the fourth stamp, "ВС" (or "VS"), is unknown although it could be the retailer who sold the creamer - that is if Dubrovin did not have a retail shop of his own.

Excellent condition. No bumps or scratches to the silver. The condition of the ivory handle is remarkable and exhibits only the most minor age marks; as can be seen from our photographs, it has a warm appearance and shows little of the shading that sometimes turns quite dark on older items made of ivory.

At close hand, it is possible two see that the handle has seen minor readjustments where it fits into the two sockets. This does not detract in the least from the creamer's appearance. Until silverware and silver dining accessories began to be mass produced around the end of the nineteenth century, silver creamers and tea pots were regularly returned to jeweler's workshops for adjustment because the wood handles became loose. It was not until the development of Bakelite and similar "permanent" materials that the need for periodic repairs more or less stopped.

Delightful and beautifully made creamer; besides being uncommonly attractive, it is completely solid and large enough that it could still render good service at a dinner party or a holiday meal.
$745.00  Add to cart